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Welcome to Jackson County, Ohio!  |  740-286-2838  |  Email us

Our area’s utilities have abundant capacity at affordable rates

No tax on machinery and equipment investments


No tax on R&D investments

Jackson County, Ohio knows a key concern of today’s successful companies is whether they’ll have enough utility resources to fuel their plans for growth. The good news is that our area is served by a robust network of utilities with abundant capacity. From water, wastewater service, electricity, natural gas, and broadband, we can accommodate the needs of demanding industries such as food processing, manufacturing, logistics and distribution, and wood products.

Our area sits atop the Teays Valley aquifer system, providing a virtually unlimited supply of clean, fresh water. Local water utilities currently have access to excess available capacity of up to 2.7 million gallons per day, along with excess wastewater processing capacity of nearly 1.5 million gallons per day, so they’re able to meet the needs of food processors and other companies that have a strong thirst for fresh water.

When it comes to electricity, local companies benefit from a power infrastructure involving three different providers. Our county is served by American Electric Power (AEP), the city of Jackson’s electric utility (part of American Municipal Power), and Buckeye Rural Electric Co-Op. These three providers have built a modern, reliable network to serve local businesses and residents, with on-site substations, reliability features such as redundant feeds and loops, and a dedication to personal service. Natural gas is supplied by regional provider Columbia Gas and other providers, with plenty of capacity for demanding applications.

Another critically important utility is broadband access. Our county’s broadband providers are fully capable of meeting and exceeding the most demanding needs for high-speed access and redundant feeds. The city of Jackson provides a robust broadband infrastructure, owning six strands of its own dark fiber.